Asian Representation in Popular Culture

I recently wrote a post about the dominance of White people and culture in every facet of society here in America (you can read the post HERE.), and I have been thinking a lot lately about Asian representation in popular culture. Surely there are more than just classic martial art films? (Cue the sound of crickets endlessly chirping away.)

I look over at the African-American community. They have come such a long way. Last year, the film Moonlight won best picture. They have won Oscars in all of the major acting categories. They have formidable pop stars. (Beyonce and Rihanna anyone?) Rap, R&B, and Hip hop have become mainstream mainstays. They have brought us jazz, blues, and Michael Jackson. A man by the name of Barrack Obama showed us all how its done, and recently, they have given us Black Panther–the first real African American super hero franchise. They are AMAZING.

Then, I look over at the rest of us–the Asians, Latinos, and everyone from the Middle East. We have yet to fully stake our claim at the table.  You can argue that many opportunities are being denied us, but what we must ultimately do is stand up and show up.

Unless we actively share our art with the world, no one will hear our voices. As a person of color, I need to rise above the limitations, the whitewashing, the gentrification, and the marginalizing. I need to stand up and be heard.

The cultural landscape is not completely devoid of empowered Asians. I wanted to highlight a small handful of them here who are officially kicking some serious ass. They are forging a path for the rest of us. We will all stand up and follow .  .  .

Nathan Chen

He is, arguably, the Michael Jordan of figure skating. It was refreshing to see a Chinese-American be the face of the US Olympic team in the media and in commercials leading up to the winter games in Pyeongchang, Korea. Even though we’ve already had titans like Kristi Yamaguchi and Michelle Kwan before him, it felt as if this time someone of Asian descent was legitimately embraced as marketable and worthy of  hype and attention.

By the end of the competition, he made history by being the first of any Olympian to land five quad jumps in a single program in competition. He’s bad ass, and I’m so proud of how the whole country rooted for him.

Mirai Nagasu and Karen Chen

Asian women have been dominant forces in American figure skating over the past few decades.  Again, Kristi Yamaguchi and Michelle Kwan come to mind. Carrying on in this tradition are Mirai Nagasu who was the first American woman to land a triple axel in Olympic competition and her teammate Karen Chen. Both of them have been US Champions and Olympians.  Gritty athleticism, hard work, and pure talent have taken them this far. I hope many more will follow.

Francis Lam

The show “The Splendid Table” on NPR has been a longstanding favorite among food enthusiasts in America and all over the world.  When its founder and host Lynn Rossetto Kasper announced that she was retiring, there was much trepidation surrounding the show’s future. It was not long before it was announced that Francis Lam would take over as host of the show. Armed with an encyclopedic knowledge of food and cooking, as well as an easygoing and comforting over-the-air presence, he has taken the show into new directions toward international flavors and delicacies. He is the son of Chinese immigrants and is so good at his job!  Listen to the Splendid Table on NPR! He’s totally worth it.

Vienna Teng

In the indie music scene, she is well-known, revered, and beloved. Vienna Teng is a singer/songwriter and pianist whose music is rich with poetic lyricism and gorgeous melodies. I’ve been to her shows, and she is the real deal. Her piano work is first-rate. There is a gentle shrewdness behind each of her songs. She gives us narrative arcs that force us to cram our minds into tight and uncomfortable spaces, only to set us free by the final chords. Currently, she splits her time between a successful  indie music career and work as a climate change consultant for international corporations. Isn’t that amazing? If you haven’t heard her music yet, check her out.

I will be featuring more Asian artists and content creators in the future, and I too, will stand up to be heard.

You’ll see.

-Roqué

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Roqué’s Winter Music Playlist

There are certain songs and pieces of music that seem to be perfect for the winter time. The cold winds that blow and make you feel colder, the barren and dormant trees looming everywhere, and the never-ending gray clouds all create a mood of thoughtfulness and longing.

As an introvert, this has become my favorite time of year. There are no bright colors and rays from the sun to distract you from yourself. This is the time for me to fold inward and pursue contemplation. The feeling of warmth under a blanket is the most comforting experience. Warm coffee was designed for winter.  Music of a specific mood and timbre can be the best compliment to this marriage of jarring cold and decadent warmth.

Here are some of my music picks for this lonesome wintertime  .  .  .

Within by Daft Punk

I fell in love with this song the first time I heard it. The cascading piano line at the beginning just floors me.  Searching, lost, and oh so delicate .  .  .

Karma Police by Radiohead

This song accomplishes what has made Radiohead a towering artistic force. Lead singer Thom Yorke’s vocals haunt this song with a yearning for retribution .  .  .

Kansas by Vienna Teng

I have been a fan of Vienna Teng for many years now. Of all her wonderful songs, this one is my current favorite. You get a sense of desolation from these lyrics, in the way that a place like Kansas could only evoke .  .  .

Piano In the Dark By Brenda Russell

I am going to cover this song some day. It’s so good. An oldy but goody. If you’ve ever been drawn to someone so forcefully that every attempt to let go was futile, this song is for you .  .  .

On the Nature of Daylight by Max Richter

I recently discovered this piece of music when it was featured during the opening and closing segments of the film Arrival (which is a beautiful film by the way). This music takes its time to build slowly, but when it gets to where its going, you’ll want to either cry  or find someone to embrace. There is something tender and rich about this piece.  I love it so much.

Fast Car by Tracy Chapman

There is an aching hopefulness in this song, the kind that grows out of trying circumstances and when doing your best just isn’t enough. It talks about making plans for a  better future against strong odds, when one flows desperately against a rising tide.  I’ve loved this song for many years, and it is a faithful winter standard  .  .  .

Never Is a Promise by Fiona Apple

There is a reason why I have covered this song at my shows for a long time.  It radiates defiance, the same way that trees resist a hard and cold wind in the darkest of winters. We are nothing if we cannot be defiant.  This song tells you to light your own fire in spite of what you may otherwise be led to believe.  A fire in winter never felt so good .  .  .

I may feature more songs for the winter before this season ends. Until then, enjoy the nakedness of trees and the tiny slivers of sunlight that break through the grey clouds.  Or, just enjoy the grey.  Every color deserves its time to be seen.

-Roqué

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