Delicious Filipino Food on The Splendid Table

This week, I wanted to highlight a recent episode of NPR’s  food and cooking show The Splendid Table in which they explore the growing Filipino food movement here in America. Being a Filipino myself, I grew up eating some of the most delicious and flavorful foods from my home country.

I have always been sad that Filipino food is not as ubiquitous as Chinese or Japanese cuisine, but maybe this is actually a blessing.  Dishes like adobo, sinigang, and lumpia can continue to be the best kept secrets that they are, and they can be spared from becoming generic and homogenized.

Here is the episode from The Splendid Table.  Its engaging host Francis Lam interviews several Filipino chefs and talks about some great Filipino restaurants across the country.  Check it out and press play  .  .  .

 

One of this episode’s interviewees, Joanne Boston, also lists some of the more prominent Filipino restaurants throughout the country.  If you live in or will be visiting these areas, check them out!  If you have never had Filipino food, it is like nothing else from Asia .  .  .

Joanne Boston’s Suggested Restaurants for Filipino Cuisine in the US

San Francisco:

  • Buffalo Theory
  • FOB Kitchen
  • Tselogs
  • Alchemy Pop-Up
  • Pampaguena
  • Manila Bowl

SF Bay Area:

  • Patio Filipino
  • Attic
  • Fort McKinley
  • Hapag Filipino

New York:

  • Purple Yam
  • Maharlika
  • Ugly Kitchen

St. Louis:

  • Guerrilla Street Food
  • Skip to Malou

Washington DC:

  • Purple Patch
  • Bad Saint

Seattle:

  • Oriental Mart
  • Hood Famous Bakeshop
  • Lahi Pop-Up
  • Food & Sh*t Pop-Up

Los Angeles and surrounding areas

  • Irenia
  • LASA
  • Ricebar

Chicago:

  • Isla Pilipina
  • Hong Ning
  • Uncle Mike’s Place

If you find yourself in a Filipino restaurant and at a loss for what to eat, I would recommend chicken or pork adobo for starters as well as lumpia. Adobo is a sweet and savory flavor that is a Filipino staple applied to any kind of meat. If cooked well, the meat is juicy and tender and the sauce can be mixed in with  the warm and sticky rice that should come with it. These elements combine to make a dining experience that will make you want to hug somebody.

Lumpia is the Filipino version of a fried egg roll, except that it is generally meat based and tastes nothing like the Chinese version. It is usually packed with all kinds of seasoning and is unapologetically crunchy and oily. They are decadent and delicious.  You will want to eat a few of these.

This will not be the last time that I blog about Filipino food. I may share some recipes and show photos of what I have cooked. So far, I know how to make adobo, Filipino fruit salad, pansit, lumpia, and dinuguan. Learning tinola and sinigang are next up on my list.

Feel free to post any thoughts and questions you might have about Filipino cuisine. Find or make a dish and savor every bite.

-Roqué

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Creativity and Identity: To Be is To Do

Roque in Bloom blog, creativity

I have learned to redefine what I believe a creative person is.  It is not solely about the label of being a “performer”, “musician”, “inventor”, or “sculptor”.  As one’s identity relates to creativity, it has less to do with an actual title and more to do with an active state of doing creative work.

A creative person performs music every day.  She works on developing a new invention on a regular basis.  She has designated times to work on a current sculpture or 3-dimentional concept.  He is constantly tweaking a new business plan or marketing strategy.

A creative person is actively engaged in the work and craftsmanship of creating.

To settle on a label such as “artist”, “singer”, or “strategist” is to be passive.  We are all more than what any one word could encapsulate. This is why I think of creativity as a constant state of movement and innovation.

I make this distinction because I get asked all of the time what I like to do.  For the most part, I tell people that I create art through music and visual media every day.  I stay away from using labels, and I choose not to limit who I am and what I can or cannot do.

I know that labels help everyone else understand, relate to, and conceptualize what I do, but first of all, it is not my responsibility to help everyone do that.  Secondly, I can be intentional about describing the work I do instead of just giving a label.

Creativity is a way of life.  A fluid mindset.  A flow of movement.

This perspective and small pivot in how I perceive myself keeps me more open to limitless possibilities as a creative person.

Creativity is in the doing.  The being will always be secondary.

If any deeper explanations are needed, your creative output that you actively work on every day will speak for itself.

-Roqué